Boston Concrete Cutting
288 Grove Street, Unit 110
Braintree, MA 02184


781-519-2456
info@bostonconcretecutting.com
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Concrete Cutting Sawing Whitman MA Mass Massachusetts

Welcome to BostonConcreteCutting.Com

“We Specialize in Cutting Doorways and Windows in Concrete Foundations”

Are You in Whitman Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Whitman MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

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When bends with a short radius are required, the bars are placed in the vise, near the point where the bend is wanted, and the end of the bar is pulled around until the required angle is secured. The vise is usually fastened to the table. The lever is also used in making bends of short radii. This is done by placing the bar between the prongs and pulling the end of the lever around until the required shape is secured. The bar-bending device shown in Fig. 175 was devised by Mr. R. S. Hunt, C. E., and has been used by him to bend 1-inch bars. In bending bars of this size, it is not necessary to heat them; and the size steel bars that can be shaped by this bender depend largely on the proportions of the materials of which the bender is constructed. In constructing this device, a timber 10 inches by 10 inches and about 10 feet long is supported on posts and well braced, the top of the timber being about 3 feet high. A 2 by 4-inch plank is spiked on one edge of the 10 by 10-inch timber, the smaller timber extending to within 12 inches of the end of the larger, as shown in the figure. On the edge of the 2 by 4-inch timber, is fastened a1-inch by 2-inch steel strap, which is the same length as the timber to which it is fastened. Opposite the end of the timber, and 3 inches from the timber, is a steel pin 112 inches in diameter. The lever is usually about 3 feet long, and made as shown in the figure.

To bend a bar with this device, the bar is placed against the steel strap with the point of the bar at which the bend is to he made opposite the steel pin. The lever is hooked on the pin, while being held at right angles to the bar to be bent. The plug on the lever rests against the bar; and by moving the lever towards the end of timber, the required bend is given to the bar. For smaller sizes of bars, a washer should be placed over the pin so as to reduce the space between the pin and the bar to be bent. Fig. 176 shows the bending details of the bars for a concrete beam or girder in which six bars are required for the reinforcement three of which are turned up, one at a distance of 3 feet, and two at a distance of 4 feet from the center of the span. The light lines indicate the depth of the concrete beam, including the thickness of the concrete slab; the vertical dash-and-dot lined the center of the supports of the concrete beam; and the heavy full lines, the bars. When plain bars are used for reinforced concrete, architects and engineers very often require that the ends of all the bars in the concrete beams and girders shall be hooked as shown in Fig. 177.

This is done to prevent the bars from slipping before their tensile strength is fully developed. To secure the advantage of a continuous concrete slab, it is very often required that a percentage of the concrete slab bars, usually one-half, shall be turned up over each concrete beam. Construction companies have different methods of bending and holding these bars in place; but the method shown in Fig. 178 will insure good results, as the concrete slab bars are well supported by the two longitudinal bars which are wired to the tops of the stirrups. Fig. 179 shows the bending details of concrete slab bars, the concrete beams being spaced six feet center to center. Fig. 180 shows the bending of the bars for stirrups. The ends of the stirrups rest on the forms and support the concrete beam bars, which assist in keeping these bars in place. The ends of the stirrups seldom show on the bottom of the concrete slab of the finished concrete floor. Sufficient mortar seems to get under the ends of the stirrups to cover them. Type a is much more extensively used than type b. The latter type is generally used when a large amount of steel is required for stirrups, or if the stirrups are made of very small bars. Two types of concrete column bands are shown. Type A shows bands for a square or a round concrete column; and type b, bands for a rectangular concrete column.

Are You in Whitman Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Whitman MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

Boston Concrete Cutting | 288 Grove Street, Unit 110, Braintree, MA 02184 | 781-519-2456 | info@bostonconcretecutting.com