Boston Concrete Cutting
288 Grove Street, Unit 110
Braintree, MA 02184


781-519-2456
info@bostonconcretecutting.com
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Concrete Cutting Sawing Wareham MA Mass Massachusetts

Welcome to BostonConcreteCutting.Com

“We Specialize in Cutting Doorways and Windows in Concrete Foundations”

Are You in Wareham Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Wareham MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

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A concrete waterway of 18 feet was required in the canal span by the State Canal Commissioner, and this passage was arranged under the center of the arch. The concrete piles were driven by means of a scow. The cap for the concrete piles was a 3 by 12-inch timber. Plank 2 inches thick were sawed to the correct curvature, and nailed to the 2 by 12-inch joists, which were spaced about 12 inches apart. The lagging was one inch thick, and was nailed to the curved plank. The wedges were made and used as shown. The centering was constantly checked; this was found important after a strong wind. The centering for the other two of the main arches was constructed similarly to that-of the arch shown. After some difficulty had been experienced in keeping the forms in place during the concreting of the first arch, the concrete for the other arches was placed as shown in Fig. 172, and no difficulty was encountered. Sections 1 and 1 were first placed, then 2 and 2, finishing with section 6. The concreting on the canal span was begun November 1, and finished November 12; and the forms were lowered by means of the wedges five weeks later. The deflection at the crown was 0.5 inch, and after the spandrel concrete walls were built and the fill made, there was an additional deflection of 0.4 inch. In building the forms, an allowance of part of the span was made, to allow for this deflection. The deflections at the crown of the other three arches were 0.6 inch, 1.45 inches, and 1.34 inches. The full bending details of the bars should be made before the reinforcing steel is ordered for any reinforced-concrete work that is to be constructed. It has been the common practice for contractors to make these details, if they are made; and they may or may not submit them to the designing architects or engineers for their approval. Very often the plans or specifications do not state how long the bars are to be, or even state what lap of the bars is required; or they may not be very definite in the number of bars to he turned up in the concrete beams and girders. If architects and engineers would make these details and submit them with their general drawings, the concrete contractors could then make a very definite estimate on the amount of steel required for the work, and these details should also assist the contractor in estimating the cost of the bending of the bars. With the assistance of these details being made very definite, it should not only assist the contractor in making his bid on the work, but would often result in better work being done. The angle, at which the diagonal bars are turned up, varies from about 10 degrees to 45 degrees, and sometimes to a greater angle than 45 degrees. A great deal depends upon the length and depth of the concrete beam or girder. If the concrete beam is very short and deep, the bars are usually turned up at an angle of about 45 degrees, or perhaps a little greater; but if the concrete beam is long and shallow, the angle at which these bars are turned is very small. This angle, in the average practice, is about 30 degrees. The bending of the bars is usually a simple matter, and generally can he easily and quickly done. If bends of 30 degrees or more, with short radii, are required of large bars-1 inch to 1 inches square—it is usually necessary to heat the bars. This makes the bending more expensive, as it requires the use of forges and blacksmiths to do the work. The usual outfit for bending the bars cold consists of a strong table, a vise, and a lever with two short prongs. The outline to which the bar is to be bent is laid out on the table, and holes are bored at the point where the bends are to be made. Steel plugs 5 inches to 6 inches long are then placed in these holes. Short pieces of boards are nailed to the table where necessary, to hold the bar in place while being bent. The bar is then placed in the position A-B, Fig. 173, and bent around the plugs C and D, and then around the plugs B and F, until the ends EH and FG are parallel to AB. The building was constructed structurally of reinforced concrete, except the first concrete floor and the concrete columns in the lower concrete floors. The concrete floors were all designed to carry 200 pounds per square foot. The side concrete walls were constructed of light-colored brick, and trimmed with terra-cotta. The first concrete floor was constructed especially to suit the requirements of the chemical company that is to occupy the building for several years. If this company should leave the building when their present lease expires, it will very probably be necessary to reconstruct the first concrete floor; and therefore it was constructed of structural steel, as it will be much easier to remove a concrete floor constructed of structural steel than one constructed of reinforced concrete. The footings for each of the interior concrete columns were designed as single footings. They were 10 feet square, 30 inches thick, and were reinforced as shown in Fig. 188. The concrete columns in the basement, first, and second concrete floors, were of structural steel, and fireproofed with concrete. The concrete wall concrete columns were either square or rectangular in shape and the interior concrete columns were round, being twenty inches in diameter. The stress allowed in the structural steel of these concrete columns was 16,000 pounds per square inch of the steel section; but no allowance was made for the four small bars placed in the concrete column. These steel cores were provided with angle brackets to support the concrete beams, and with spread bases to transmit the stress in the steel to the concrete foundation. The cores are composed of angles and plates, and are riveted together in the usual manner. The concrete columns were built in sections of a length equal to the height of two stories. The extra metal required in this practice was very small; and the expense of half the joints, if a change of section had been made at each concrete floor, was saved.      The general outline and details of these steel cores are illustrated in Fig. 189 In the exterior concrete columns, the steel cores were used in the basement and the first, second, and third concrete floors, where necessary; in the interior concrete columns, they were used also in the fourth story, and in two concrete columns the structural steel extended to the sixth concrete floor line. The exterior concrete columns above the structural steel, and also the concrete columns in which structural steel was not required, were in general reinforced with 8 bars 1 inch square, in the lower concrete floors; and this amount of steel was gradually reduced to 4 bars 1 inch square, in the seventh story. In the interior concrete columns, the reinforcement above the steel cores consisted of 8 bars 1 inch square, in the concrete floor just above the structural steel; and the number of these bars was gradually reduced to 4 in the seventh concrete floor. The concrete floor-concrete slab was 5 inches thick, and was reinforced with - inch square bars spaced 6 inches and (156)1-inch bars were placed in the concrete slab near the top, at right angles to the girders. The bars were 12 inches center to center, and were placed over the center of the girders. The concrete wall beams or lintels on the Fifth Street and Appletree Street sides of the building are shown in section in Fig. 191. They are 9 inches by 24 inches, and are reinforced with 2 bars 1 inch square. The concrete wall girders in the side of the building opposite Appletree Street are 14 inches by 24 inches, and are reinforced with 6 bars 1 inch square. The stairs were constructed as shown in Fig. 192. The structural concrete slab was 6 inches thick, and was reinforced with - inch bars. Safety treads 52 inches in width, and 12 inches shorter than the width of the stairs, were set in each step. The concrete for the concrete beams, girders, concrete slabs, and footings was a 1: 2: 5 mixtures; and for the concrete columns, a 1: 2: 4 mixtures were required. The stone used in this concrete was trap rock. The concrete was mixed in a batch concrete mixer, and the consistency of the mixture was what is commonly known as a wet mixture. Square twisted bars were used as the reinforcing steel. The first, second, and third concrete floors were finished with 1k-inch maple concrete flooring: The stringers, 2 inches by 3 inches, were spaced 16 inches apart, and the space between the stringers was filled with cinder concrete. The other concrete floors were finished with a one-inch coat of cement finish. A cinder fill 2 inches thick was laid on the concrete floor-concrete slab, on which was laid the cement finish. The cinder concrete consisted of 1 part Portland cement, 3 parts sand, and 7 parts cinders. The cement finish was composed of 1 part Portland cement, I part sand, and 1 part '-inch crushed granite. Fig. 193 shows the plan of the concrete foundations and the typical layout of the structural members for each concrete floor of a building constructed by Cramp & Company.

Are You in Wareham Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Wareham MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

Boston Concrete Cutting | 288 Grove Street, Unit 110, Braintree, MA 02184 | 781-519-2456 | info@bostonconcretecutting.com