Boston Concrete Cutting
288 Grove Street, Unit 110
Braintree, MA 02184


781-519-2456
info@bostonconcretecutting.com
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Concrete Cutting Sawing Swansea MA Mass Massachusetts

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“We Specialize in Cutting Doorways and Windows in Concrete Foundations”

Are You in Swansea Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Swansea MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

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To find the safe load for concrete beams of hemlock from the above table, the above values must be divided by 2; for concrete beams of short-leaf yellow pine and white oak, the values must be divided by 1.2; for white pine, spruce, eastern fir, and chestnut, the values must be divided by 1.71 times three wedges are used, as shown by b in the same figure. They are from one to two feet long, 6 to 8 inches wide, and have a slope of from 1 to 6 to 1 to 10. The centering is lowered by driving back the wedges; and to do this slowly, it is necessary that the wedges have a very slight taper. All wedges should be driven equally when the centering is being lowered. The wedges should be made of hardwood, and are placed on top of the vertical supports or on timbers which rest on the supports. The wedges are placed at about the same elevation as the springing line of the arch.

Tables XXI and XXII can be used to assist in the design of the different members of the centers for arches. In Table XXI are given the safe loads which may be placed on concrete beams of longleaf yellow pine, of various depths, on various spans spaced 24 inches on centers the latter being placed at right angles to the former. The roof concrete slab was designed to carry a live load of 40 pounds per square foot, and was 3- inches thick. The reinforcement consisted of (11) 6-inch bars spaced 6 inches, and the same sized bars spaced 24 inches at right angles. The concrete floor-concrete beams were in general 8 inches wide, and the depth below the concrete slab was 18 inches. The amount of reinforcement in the concrete beams varied, depending on the length of the concrete beams. Most of the concrete beams were reinforced with 2 bars 1 inch square, and ii bar 1* inches square. The 1-inch bar was turned up or trussed at the ends, and the 1-inch bars were straight. The roof concrete beams were 6 by 12-inch below the concrete slab, and were reinforced with 2 bars inch square, except in the longest concrete beams, in which 2 bars 1inch square were required. .A 1-inch bar, 5 feet long, was placed in the top of the concrete floors and roof concrete beams, where they were framed into a girder. The ends of these bars were turned down. The stirrups were made of 1-inch round bars, and were spaced as shown in the detail of the concrete beam See Fig. 190. The concrete floor girders were 12 by 24-inch below the concrete slab. The span of the girders varied froth about 18 feet to about 20 feet; and they were all reinforced with 6 bars 1 inch square, three of the bars being turned up at the ends. Two i-inch square bars were placed in the top of the girders over the supports.

These bars were 5 feet long, and they were hooked at the ends. Bars * inch square, 5 feet long. To find the load that a wooden concrete column will support per square inch of sectional area, from the above table, the length of the concrete column in inches is divided by the least diameter of the concrete column, and the result is the ratio of length to diameter of the concrete column. From this ratio is found the ultimate strength per square inch of section of a concrete column of any kind of wood given in the table. A factor of safety of 5 should be used in finding the size of concrete column required; that is, the working load should not be greater than one-fifth of the values given in the table. The values given in Table XXI are the safe loads in pounds uniformly distributed, exclusive of the weight of the concrete beam itself, for rectangular concrete beams one inch thick. The safe load for a concrete beam of any thickness may be found by multiplying the values given in the tables by the thickness of the concrete beam in inches. From the last concrete column, the deflection may be obtained, corresponding to the given span and safe load, by dividing the coefficient by the depth of the concrete beam in inches, which will give approximately the deflection in inches. If a concrete beam is required to support a uniformly distributed load of 4,000 pounds on a span of 10 feet, what would be the dimensions of the concrete beam of long-leaf yellow pine, and what would be the deflection?

Are You in Swansea Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Swansea MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

Boston Concrete Cutting | 288 Grove Street, Unit 110, Braintree, MA 02184 | 781-519-2456 | info@bostonconcretecutting.com