Boston Concrete Cutting
288 Grove Street, Unit 110
Braintree, MA 02184


781-519-2456
info@bostonconcretecutting.com
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Concrete Cutting Sawing Somerset MA Mass Massachusetts

Welcome to BostonConcreteCutting.Com

“We Specialize in Cutting Doorways and Windows in Concrete Foundations”

Are You in Somerset Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Somerset MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

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The plank against which the concrete is placed is seldom less than 1 inches thick, and is usually 2 inches thick. One-inch plank is sometimes used for very thin concrete walls; but even then, the supports must he placed close. The planks are generally surfaced on the side against which the concrete is placed. The vertical timbers that hold the plank in place will vary in size from 2 inches by 4 inches to 4 inches by 6 inches, or even larger, depending on the thickness of the concrete wall, spacing of these vertical timbers, etc. The vertical timbers are always placed in pairs, and are held in place usually by means of bolts, except for thin concrete walls, when heavy wire is often used. If the bolts are greased before the concrete is placed, there is usually not much trouble experienced in removing them. Some contractors place the bolts in short pieces of pipe, the diameter of the pipe being about inch greater than that of the bolt, and the length equal to the thickness of the concrete wall. When the bolts are removed, the holes are filled with concrete mortar. The centers for stone, plain concrete, and reinforced concrete arches are constructed in a similar manner. A reinforced concrete arch of the same span and designed for the same loading, will not be as heavy as a plain concrete or stone arch, and the centers need not be constructed so strong as for the other types of arches. One essential difference in the centering for stone arches and that for concrete or reinforced-concrete arches is that centering for the latter types of arches serves as a mould for shaping the soffit of the arch- ring, the face of the arch-ring, and the spandrel concrete walls.

The successful construction of arches depends nearly as much on the centers and their supports as it does on the design of the arch. The centers should be as well constructed and the supports as unyielding as it are possible to make them. When it is necessary to use concrete piles, they should be as well driven as permanent foundation concrete piles, and the load should not generally be heavier than that on permanent concrete piles. There are two general classes of centers-those which act as a truss; and those in which the support, at the intersection of braces, rests on a pile or footing. Trusses are used when it is necessary to span a stream or roadway. Sometimes the length of the span for the centering is very short, or there are a series of short spans, or the span may be equal to that of the arch. The trusses must be carefully designed, so that the deflection and deform due to the changes in the loading will be reduced to a minimum. By placing a temporary load on the centers at the crown, the deformation during construction may be very greatly reduced. This load is removed as the weight of the arches comes on the centers. For the design of trusses, the reader is referred to instruction papers or other treatises on Bridge Engineering and Roof Trusses.

The lagging for concrete arches usually consists of 2 by 3-inch or 2 by 4-inch plank, either set on edge or laid flat, depending on the thickness of the arch and spacing of the supports. The surface on which the concrete is laid is usually surfaced on the side on which the concrete is to he placed. The lagging is very often supported on ribs constructed of 2 by 12-inch plank, on the back of which is placed a 2-inch plank cut to a curve parallel with the intrados. These 2 by 12-inch planks are set down while centering, for the deflection of the arch after the removal of the centering, and for permanent camber. The centers should be constructed so that they can be easily taken down. To facilitate the striking of centers, they are usually supported on folding wedges or sand-boxes. When the latter method is used, the sand should be fine, clean, and perfectly dry, and the boxes should be sealed around the plunger with cement concrete mortar. Striking concrete forms by means of wedges is the commoner method. In Fig. 169, shows the type of wedges generally used, although some on the timber used to cap the concrete piles, and are usually spaced about 2 feet apart. All the supports should be well braced. The centers should be constructed to give a camber to the arch about equal to the deflection of the arch when under full load. It is therefore necessary to make an allowance for the settlement of all poured concrete.

Are You in Somerset Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Somerset MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

Boston Concrete Cutting | 288 Grove Street, Unit 110, Braintree, MA 02184 | 781-519-2456 | info@bostonconcretecutting.com