Boston Concrete Cutting
288 Grove Street, Unit 110
Braintree, MA 02184


781-519-2456
info@bostonconcretecutting.com
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Concrete Cutting Sawing Seekonk MA Mass Massachusetts

Welcome to BostonConcreteCutting.Com

“We Specialize in Cutting Doorways and Windows in Concrete Foundations”

Are You in Seekonk Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Seekonk MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

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They must be constructed so that they can readily be put up and taken down, and can be used several times on the same job. The concrete forms must give a smooth and even finish to the interior of the sewer or conduit. This has been accomplished on several jobs by covering the concrete forms with light-weight sheet iron. These concrete forms are usually built in lengths of 16 feet, with one center at each end, and with three to five (depending on the size of the sewer or conduit) intermediate centers in the lengths of 15 feet. The segmental ribs are bolted together. The plank for these concrete forms is made of 2 by 4-inch material, surfaced on the outer side, with the edge beveled to the radius of the conduit. The segmental ribs are bolted together, and are held in place by wooden ties 2 by 4 inches or 2 by 6 inches. In constructing the concrete filters for supplying Philadelphia with water, several large sewers and conduits were built of concrete and reinforced with expanded metal. In section the sewers were round and the conduits were horseshoe-shaped, with a comparatively flat bottom. The sewers were 6 feet and 8 feet 6 inches in diameter, and the concrete forms were constructed similarly to the concrete forms shown in Fig. 165, except that at the bottom the lower side ribs were connected to the bottom rib by a horizontal joint, and the spacing of the ribs was 2 feet 6 inches, center to center. Fig. 166 shows the concrete forms for the 7-foot 6-inch conduit. The centering for the 9-foot and 10-foot conduits was constructed similarly to the 7-foot 6-inch conduit, except that the ribs were divided into 7 parts instead of 5 parts as shown in Fig. 166. The spacing of the braces depended on the thickness of the lagging. For lagging 1 inch by 2 inches, the braces were spaced 18 inches, center to center; and for 2 by 3-inch lagging, the spacing of the bracing was 2 feet 6 inches. These concrete forms were constructed in lengths of 8 feet. The lagging for the smaller sizes of the conduits was 1 inch by 21 inches, and for the larger sizes 2 inches by 3 inches, all of which was made of dressed lumber and covered with No. 27 galvanized sheet iron. The bracing of the concrete forms was arranged to permit the centering being taken apart and brought forward through the sections set in front of it. Three sets of these concrete forms were required for each conduit. The specifications replace for at least 6o hours after the concrete had been placed. It was also required that this work should be constructed in monolithic sections that is, the contractor could build as long a section as he could finish in a day; and that the sections should be securely keyed together. There have been many attempts to devise steel centering for concrete column, girder, and concrete slab construction, but no available system has yet been invented. The main trouble of those used is their liability to leak, tendency to rust, and liability to injury by dents in removing.

The collapsible steel centering is in general use for sewer and conduit construction. This centering consists of one or more steel plates about 1-inch thick and bent to the shape required by the interior of the sewer to be constructed. The steel plates are held in shape by angle irons. When set in position, the sections are held rigid by means of turnbuckles, which also facilitate the collapsing of the sections. The adjacent sections are held together by staples and wedges, the concrete forms being riveted to the plates. The sections are usually made five feet long, and in any desired shape or size required for sewer or conduit work. When these concrete forms are used to construct concrete sewers or conduits, the surface of the concrete forms must be well coated with grease or soap to prevent the concrete from adhering to the steel.

The concrete forms for concrete walls should be built strong enough so that they will retain their correct position while the concrete is being placed and rammed. In high, thin concrete walls, a great deal of care is required to keep the concrete forms in place so that the concrete wall will be true and Fig. 168 shows a very common method of constructing these concrete forms.

Are You in Seekonk Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Seekonk MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

Boston Concrete Cutting | 288 Grove Street, Unit 110, Braintree, MA 02184 | 781-519-2456 | info@bostonconcretecutting.com