Boston Concrete Cutting
288 Grove Street, Unit 110
Braintree, MA 02184


781-519-2456
info@bostonconcretecutting.com
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Concrete Cutting Sawing Rockland MA Mass Massachusetts

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“We Specialize in Cutting Doorways and Windows in Concrete Foundations”

Are You in Rockland Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Rockland MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

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When the bottom of the I-beam is to be covered with concrete, it is not so easily done as when the haunch rests on the bottom flange (Fig. 159) or is a flat plate (Fig. 160). The concrete forms used in constructing the building for the Locust Realty Company (the mixing plant has already been described), present one rather unusual feature. The lumber for the concrete slabs, beams, girders, and concrete columns was all the same thickness, 11 inches. Fig. 161 shows the details of the concrete forms for the beams and concrete slabs. The beams are spaced about 6 feet apart, and are 8by16 inches; the concrete slab is 4 inches thick. A notch is cut into the 1 by 6-inch strip on the side of the beams, to support the 2 by 4-inch strip under the plank which supports the concrete for the concrete slab. The between I-Beams posts supporting the concrete forms are 3 by 3k-inch, and are braced by two 1 by 6-inch  boards spaced about 3 feet apart, and extending in the direction of the beams. Fig. 162 shows the concrete forms for the concrete columns. The planks for each side of the concrete column are held together by the 1 by 4-inch strip, and, when erected in place, are clamped by the 2 by 4-inch strip. A large opening is left at the bottom of each concrete column, so that all shavings and sawdust can be removed.

This opening is closed just before the concrete is deposited. An analysis of the cost of concrete forms for an eight-story building is given by R. E. Lamb (Concrete Engineering, December, 1907). The basis of his estimate is made on using 1-inch by 6-inch tongued-and--grooved lumber for concrete slab concrete forms; 1-inch dressed plank for the sides and bottom of the beams and girders; posts 4 by 4-inch spaced 6 feet center to center; and on the fact that it cost $20.00 per thousand feet of lumber to make and set one floor of concrete forms; that it cost $15.00 per thousand feet to strip the concrete forms and reset them on the next floor; and that it cost about $8.00 per thousand feet to strip the concrete forms and lower them to the ground. With the size of the beams and girders as shown in Fig. 163, Mr. Lamb states that it will take an average of 4 feet, board measure, to erect each square foot of floor area. The basis of his estimate is as follows: that 1.5 board feet of lumber per square foot of floor is required for the concrete slab; that for every square foot of beam surface, including the bottom, 3.2 board feet per square foot is required; and that for each square foot of girder, including the bottom, 3.6 board feet of lumber is required.

Taking these figures, for the panel shown, the concrete slab will require 1.5 board feet per square foot; the beams, which are 8 by 18-inch, will have 3 feet 8 inches of surface per linear foot; and multiplying this by 3.2 board feet per square foot, and dividing by 7.5 feet, the distance center to center of beams, we find that 1.56 board feet per square foot of floor surface is required. Taking the girder in the same way, with 4 feet 8 inches of surface, multiplied by 3.6 board feet, and divided by 18 feet, the distance center to center of girders, we find that 94 board foot per square foot of floor is required. The total of the lumber required, then, is 1.5 board feet for the concrete slab, 1.56 board feet for the beam, and 94 board foot for the girders—a total of 4 board feet per square foot of floor area. In this estimate for an eight-story building, three sets of concrete forms were used: Roof: Stripping the sixth floor, resetting, altering to concrete forms valleys, and finally stripping roof and lowering concrete forms to ground, 4 board feet at 2.6 cents and lowering concrete forms to ground, 4 board feet at 2.3 cents. To this average cost of 11.3 cents, 10 percent should be added for waste, breakage, nails, etc.; and if two sets of concrete forms are used, the third floor would cost 6 cents per square foot, and the seventh floor 6 cents, giving an average of 9.6 cents per square foot.

Are You in Rockland Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Rockland MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

Boston Concrete Cutting | 288 Grove Street, Unit 110, Braintree, MA 02184 | 781-519-2456 | info@bostonconcretecutting.com