Boston Concrete Cutting
288 Grove Street, Unit 110
Braintree, MA 02184


781-519-2456
info@bostonconcretecutting.com
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Concrete Cutting Sawing Rochester MA Mass Massachusetts

Welcome to BostonConcreteCutting.Com

“We Specialize in Cutting Doorways and Windows in Concrete Foundations”

Are You in Rochester Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Rochester MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

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Core Drilling Rochester MA           Core Drilling Rochester Massachusetts

Concrete Sawing Rochester MA  Concrete Sawing

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Fig. 154 B shows concrete column concrete forms similar to those used in constructing the Harvard stadium. The planks concrete forming each side of the concrete column are fastened together by cleats and then the four sides are fastened together by slotted cleats and steel tie-rods. These concrete forms can be quickly and easily removed. Fig. 155 shows a concrete column concrete forms in which concrete is placed and rammed as the concrete forms is 2x4 constructed.  Method used in constructing Harvard Stadium is erected to the full height, and the steel is then placed. The fourth side is built up with horizontal boards as the concrete is placed and rammed. Round concrete columns are often desirable for the interior concrete columns of buildings. Fig. 156 shows a concrete forms that has been used for this type of concrete column. The concrete columns for which these concrete forms were used were 20 inches in diameter, and had a star-shaped core made of structural steel. The concrete forms for each concrete column were made in two parts and bolted together.

The sides were made of 2 by 3-inch plank surfaced on all four sides, beveled on two, and held in place by the steel bands, which were 1 by 2- inches and spaced about 2 feet apart. One screw in the outer plank at each band of both parts, together with a few intermediate screws, held the plank in place. The building for which these concrete forms were made was ten stories in height. Enough concrete forms were provided for two stories, which was sufficient, as they could be removed when the concrete had been in place one week. Later these same concrete forms were used in constructing the interior concrete columns of a six-story building. Some difficulty was experienced in removing these concrete forms, owing to the concrete sticking to the plank. But had these concrete forms been made in four sections, instead of two, and well oiled, it is thought that this trouble would have been avoided. Concrete columns constructed with concrete forms as shown in Fig. 156 will not have a round surface, but will consist of many flat surfaces, 21 inches wide. If a perfectly round concrete column is desired, it will be necessary to cut the surface of the plank next to the concrete to the desired radius. Concrete forms for octagonal concrete columns can be made in a somewhat similar manner to these just described. A very common style of concrete forms for beam and concrete slab construction is shown in Fig. 157. The size of the different members of the concrete forms depends upon the size of the beams, the thickness of the concrete slabs, and the relative spacing of some of the members.

If the beam is 10 by 20 inches, and the concrete slab is 4 inches thick, then 1-inch plank supported by 2 by 6-inch timbers spaced 2 feet apart will support the concrete slab. The -sides and bottom of the beams are enclosed by 1--inch or 2-inch plank supported by 3 by 4-inch posts spaced 4 feet apart. In Fig. 158 are shown the concrete forms for a reinforced-concrete concrete slab, with I-beam construction. These concrete forms are constructed similarly to those just described. A concrete slab construction supported on I-beams, the bottom of which Fig. 157 is not covered with concrete, may have concrete forms constructed as shown in Fig. 159. This method of constructing concrete forms was designed by Mr. William F. Kearns (Taylor and Thompson, "Plain and Reinforced Concrete"). The construction of concrete forms for a concrete slab that is supported on the top Fig. 123 of I-beams is a comparatively simple process, as shown in Fig. 160. In any concrete forms of I-beam and concrete slab construction, the concrete forms can be constructed to carry the combined weight of the concrete and concrete forms.

Are You in Rochester Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Rochester MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

Boston Concrete Cutting | 288 Grove Street, Unit 110, Braintree, MA 02184 | 781-519-2456 | info@bostonconcretecutting.com