Boston Concrete Cutting
288 Grove Street, Unit 110
Braintree, MA 02184


781-519-2456
info@bostonconcretecutting.com
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Concrete Cutting Sawing North Attleborough MA Mass Massachusetts

Welcome to BostonConcreteCutting.Com

“We Specialize in Cutting Doorways and Windows in Concrete Foundations”

Are You in North Attleborough Massachusetts?

Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service North Attleborough MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

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Concrete Cutting North Attleborough Massachusetts

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Concrete Cutter North Attleborough Massachusetts

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Concrete Coring North Attleborough Massachusetts

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Core Drilling North Attleborough Massachusetts

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Concrete Sawing

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Core Drilling North Attleborough Mass

If the attendant does not watch the condition of the materials very closely, the proportions of the ingredients will vary greatly from what they should. The Trump measuring device, shown, consists of a horizontal revolving table on which rests the material to be measured, and a stationary knife set above the table and pivoted on a vertical shaft outside the circumference. The knife can be adjusted to extend a proper distance into the material, and to peel off, at each revolution of the table, a certain amount, which falls into the chute. The material peeled off is replaced from the supply contained in a bottomless storage cylinder somewhat smaller in diameter than the table and revolving with it. The depth of the cut of the knife is adjusted by swinging the knife around on its pivot so that it extends a greater or less distance into the material. The swing is controlled by a screw attached to an arm cast as part of the knife.

A micrometer scale, with pointer, indicates the position of the knife. When it is desired to measure off and mix three materials, the machines are made with three tables set one above the other and mounted on the same spindle so that they revolve together. Each table has its own storage cylinder above it, the cylinders being placed one within the other, as shown. In each case the source of power for operating the concrete mixer, conveyors, hoists, derricks, or cableways must be considered. If it is possible to run the machinery by electricity, it is generally economical to do so. But this will depend a great deal upon the local price of electricity. When all of the machinery can be supplied with steam from one centrally located boiler then this arrangement will be found perhaps more efficient. In the construction of some reinforced-concrete buildings, .a part of the machinery was operated by steam and part by electricity. In constructing the Ingalls Building, Cincinnati, the machinery was operated by a gas engine, electric motor, and a steam engine. The concrete mixer was generally run by a motor; but by shifting the belt, it could be run by the gas engine. The hoisting was done by a 20-horsepower Lidgerwood engine. This engine was also connected up to a boom derrick, to hoist lumber and steel.

The practice of operating the machinery of one plant by power from different sources, is to be questioned; but the practice of operating the concrete mixer by steam and the hoist by electricity seems to be very common in the construction of buildings A contractor, before purchasing machinery for concrete work, should carefully investigate the different sources of power for operating the machinery, not forgetting to consider the local conditions as well as general conditions. A vertical steam engine is generally used to operate the concrete mixer. The smaller sizes of engines and concrete mixers are mounted on the same frame; but on account of the weight, it is necessary to mount the larger sizes on separate frames. These engines are well-built, heavy in construction, and will stand hard work and high speed. Gasoline engines are used to some extent to operate concrete mixers. Their use so far has been limited chiefly to portable plants such as those used for street work. The fuel for the gasoline engine is much easier moved from place to place than the fuel for a steam engine. Another advantage that the gasoline engine has over the steam engine is that it does not require the constant attention of an engineer.

There are two types of engines—the horizontal and the vertical. The vertical engines occupy much less floor space for a given horsepower than the horizontal. While each type has its advantages and disadvantages, there does not really appear to be any very great advantage of one type over the other. Both types of engines are what is commonly known as four-cycle engines. In the operation of a 4-cycle engine, four strokes of the piston are required to draw in a charge of fuel, compress and ignite it, and discharge the exhaust gases.

Are You in North Attleborough Massachusetts?

Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service North Attleborough MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

Boston Concrete Cutting | 288 Grove Street, Unit 110, Braintree, MA 02184 | 781-519-2456 | info@bostonconcretecutting.com