Boston Concrete Cutting
288 Grove Street, Unit 110
Braintree, MA 02184


781-519-2456
info@bostonconcretecutting.com
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Concrete Cutting Sawing Mattapoisett MA Mass Massachusetts

Welcome to BostonConcreteCutting.Com

“We Specialize in Cutting Doorways and Windows in Concrete Foundations”

Are You in Mattapoisett Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Mattapoisett MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

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The stirrups were hot-shrunk on the longitudinal bars. The helices for the concrete columns were wound and attached to some of the vertical rods at the shop, to preserve the pitch. The vertical rods in each concrete column project 6 inches above the concrete floor line, and are connected to the bar placed on it, by a piece of pipe 12 inches long. The concrete was a 1: 2: 4 mixtures. Giant Portland cement was used and 1-inch trap rock. The placing of concrete was begun about the middle of August, 1906, and the building was completed December 20. The McGraw Building, New York City, completed in 1907, is a good example of a reinforced concrete building. The building has a frontage of 126 feet and a depth of 90 feet, and is 11 stories in height. The height of the roof is about 150 feet above the street level. The building was designed to resist the vibration of heavy printing machinery. The first and second concrete floors were designed for a live load of 250 pounds per square foot; for the third concrete floor, 150 pounds per square foot; for the fourth concrete floor and all concrete floors above the fourth concrete floor, 125 pounds per square foot.

All beams and girders were designed as continuous beams, even where supported on the outside beams. There was two times more steel over the supports as in the center of the spans. The Building Code of the City of New York requires that the moment for continuous beams be taken as-!Ii at the center of the span, and as over the support. These values are more than twice the theoretical value as computed for continuous beams. One very interesting feature of this building is that it was constructed during the winter. The first concrete was laid during September, and the concrete work was completed in April. During freezing weather, the windows of the concrete floors below the concrete floor that was being constructed were closed with canvas; and salamanders (open stoves) were distributed over the completed concrete floor, and kept in constant operation. Coke was used as the fuel for the salamanders. The concrete was mixed with hot water, and the sand and the stone were also heated. After two or three stories had been erected, and the construction force was fully organized, a concrete floor was completed in about 12 days. Three complete sets of concrete forms were provided and used. They were usually left in place nearly three weeks. In Fig. 206 are shown the -plans of stairs constructed in the Fridenberg building at 908 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. This building is 24 feet by 60 feet, and is seven stories high. Structurally the building was constructed of reinforced concrete. The stair and elevator tower is located in the rear of the main building. The plans of the stairs are interesting on account of the long-span (about 16 feet) concrete slab construction. The stairs were designed to carry safely a live load of 100 pounds per square foot; and in the theoretical calculations the concrete slab was treated as a flat concrete slab with a clear span of 16 feet.

The shear bars were wide and spaced as shown in the details. The calculations showed a low shearing value in the concrete, but stirrups were used to secure a good bond between the steel and concrete. The concrete was a 1: 2: 4 mixtures, and was mixed wet. The reinforcing steel consisted of square deformed bars, except the stirrups, which were made of 1-inch plain round steel. An interesting feature of a large reinforced-concrete building constructed for the General Electric Company at Fort Wayne, Ind., is the design of the lintels. As shown in Fig. 207, the bottom of the lintel is at the same elevation as the bottom of the concrete slab. The total space between the concrete columns is filled with double windows; and the space between the bottom of the windows and the concrete floor is filled with lintels and a thin concrete wall of reinforced concrete, as shown in the figure. The picture illustrate sections of the concrete walls of the pure water basin and the 50- foot circular concrete tanks which have been partly described in Part 1 under the heading of Waterproofing.

Are You in Mattapoisett Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Mattapoisett MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

Boston Concrete Cutting | 288 Grove Street, Unit 110, Braintree, MA 02184 | 781-519-2456 | info@bostonconcretecutting.com