Boston Concrete Cutting
288 Grove Street, Unit 110
Braintree, MA 02184


781-519-2456
info@bostonconcretecutting.com
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Concrete Cutting Sawing Bridgewater MA Mass Massachusetts

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“We Specialize in Cutting Doorways and Windows in Concrete Foundations”

Are You in Bridgewater Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Bridgewater MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

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Nevertheless these brackets must be designed according to some such method. Vertical concrete walls which are not intended to carry any weight are sometimes made of reinforced concrete. They are then called curtain concrete walls, and are designed merely to fill in the panels between the posts and girders which form the skeleton frame of the building. When these concrete walls are interior concrete walls, there is no definite stress which can be assigned to them, except by making assumptions that may be more or less unwarranted. When such concrete walls are used for exterior concrete walls of buildings, they must be designed to withstand wind pressure. This wind pressure will usually be exerted as a pressure from the outside tending to force the concrete wall inward; but if the wind is in the contrary direction, it may cause a lower atmospheric pressure on the outside, while the higher pressure of the air within the building will tend to force the concrete wall outward. It is improbable, however, that such a pressure would ever be as great as that tending to force the concrete wall inward. Such concrete walls may be designed as concrete slabs carrying a uniformly distributed load, and supported on all four sides.

If the panels are approximately square, they should have bars in both directions, and should be designed by the same method as "concrete slabs reinforced in both directions," as has previously been explained. If the vertical posts are much closer together than the height of the concrete floor, as sometimes occurs, the principal reinforcing bars should be horizontal, and the concrete walls should be designed as concrete slabs having a span equal to the distance between the posts. Some small bars spaced about 2 feet apart should be placed vertically to prevent shrinkage. The pressure of the wind corresponding to the loading of the concrete slab is usually considered to be 30 pounds per square foot, although the actual wind pressure will very largely depend on local conditions, such as the protection which the building receives from surrounding buildings. A pressure of thirty pounds per square foot is usually sufficient; and a concrete slab designed on this basis will usually be so thin, perhaps only 4 inches, that it is not desirable to make it any thinner. Since designing such concrete walls is such an obvious application of the equations and problems already solved in detail, no numerical illustration will here be given. The permanency of concrete, and particularly reinforced concrete, has caused its adoption in the construction of concrete culverts of all dimensions, from a cross-sectional area of a very few square feet, to that of an arch which might be more properly classified under the more common name concrete arch. The smaller sizes can be constructed more easily, and with less expense for the forms, by giving them a rectangular cross-section.

The question of foundations is solved most easily by making a concrete bottom, as well as side concrete walls and top. The structure then becomes literally a box. Its design consists in the determination of the external pressure exerted by the earth, and of the required thickness of the concrete to withstand the pressure on the fiat sides considered as concrete slabs. The most uncertain part of the computation lies in the determination of the actual pressure of the earth. Under the heading "Concrete retaining walls," this uncertainty was discussed. One very simple method is to assume that the earth pressure is equivalent to that of a liquid having a unit-weight equal to that of the weight of a cubic foot of the earth, which is nearly 100 pounds. Under almost any circumstances, these figures would be sufficiently large, and perhaps very excessive. Calculations on such a basis are therefore certainly safe.

Are You in Bridgewater Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Bridgewater MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

Boston Concrete Cutting | 288 Grove Street, Unit 110, Braintree, MA 02184 | 781-519-2456 | info@bostonconcretecutting.com