Boston Concrete Cutting
288 Grove Street, Unit 110
Braintree, MA 02184


781-519-2456
info@bostonconcretecutting.com
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Concrete Cutting Sawing Attleboro MA Mass Massachusetts

Welcome to BostonConcreteCutting.Com

“We Specialize in Cutting Doorways and Windows in Concrete Foundations”

Are You in Attleboro Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Attleboro MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

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With a working tension of 15,000 pounds per square inch, such a tension would be furnished by .624 square inch of metal. This equals .05 square inch of metal for each inch of height, and 2--inch bars spaced 5 inches apart will furnish this tension. The amount of this tension varies from the above, to zero at the top of the concrete wall. This tension is usually provided by small bars, such as-inch bars, which are bent at a right angle so as to hook over the horizontal bars in the face-plate and run backward to the back of the buttress. In the design described above, the extension of the toe beyond the face of the concrete wall is so short that there is no danger that the toe will be broken off on account of either shearing or transverse stress. It is usually good policy to place some transverse bars in the concrete base-plate which are perpendicular to the face of the concrete wall, and to have them extend nearly to the point of the toe. No definite calculation can be made of the required number of these bars, unless they are required to withstand transverse bending of the toe. If there is any danger that the subsoil is liable to settle, and thus produce irregular stresses on the concrete base-plate, a large reinforcement in this direction may prove necessary.

It is good policy to place at least -inch bars every 12 inches through the concrete base-plate, for the prevention of cracks; and this amount should be increased as the uncertainty in the stress in the concrete base-plate increases. Although there are no definite stresses in the top of the concrete wall, it is usual to make the thickness of the face-plate at least 6 inches at the top, and also to place a finishing cornice on top of the concrete wall, somewhat as is shown. When the subsoil is very unreliable, it is even possible that there might be a tendency for the front and back of the concrete base-plate to sink, and to break the concrete base-plate by tension of the top. This can be resisted by bars in the upper part of the concrete base-plate which are perpendicular to the concrete wall. Concrete retaining walls of very moderate height may be constructed in L-shaped sections without concrete buttresses, by thickening the concrete walls at the base, and by using sufficient reinforcement to resist the transverse stresses, which, of course, have their maximum value at the base of the concrete wall (Fig. 114). From the standpoint of cubic yards of concrete and pounds of steel, such a concrete wall is not as economical as the buttressed concrete wall, but the forms are very much simpler and are less expensive.

A low concrete wall is always made much thicker than mere theoretical computation would call for, and in such a case the additional thickening for the L design might be little or nothing. For high concrete walls twenty feet or more the economy utterly disappears. The mechanics of this form of concrete wall is quite different from the form with concrete buttresses. In the case of a buttressed concrete wall, the vertical plate between the concrete buttresses is merely designed to resist the bursting pressure on a concrete slab which has the concrete buttresses as abutments. When there are no abutments, the pressure on each unit vertical strip of the concrete wall must be computed; and the. Strength at every section (vertically) must be computed on the basis of a cantilever acted or by horizontal forces. This practically means that the moment increases from zero at the top of the concrete wall to a maximum at the base just above the concrete base-plate. Of course the mechanics of the concrete wall taken as a whole, in its pressure on the subsoil, is identical with that of the other form of concrete retaining wall.

Are You in Attleboro Massachusetts? Do You Need Concrete Cutting?

We Are Your Local Concrete Cutter

Call 781-519-2456

We Service Attleboro MA and all surrounding Cities & Towns

Boston Concrete Cutting | 288 Grove Street, Unit 110, Braintree, MA 02184 | 781-519-2456 | info@bostonconcretecutting.com